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dc.contributor.author Morales-Hojas, Ramiro
dc.contributor.author Vieira, Jorge
dc.coverage.spatial Worldwide
dc.coverage.temporal Oligocene/Miocene-present
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-15T17:12:41Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-15T17:12:41Z
dc.date.issued 2012-11-12
dc.identifier doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d
dc.identifier.citation Morales-Hojas R, Vieira J (2012) Phylogenetic patterns of geographical and ecological diversification in the subgenus Drosophila. PLoS ONE 7(11): e49552.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10255/dryad.44192
dc.description Colonisation of new geographic regions and/or of new ecological resources can result in rapid species diversification into the new ecological niches available. Members of the subgenus Drosophila are distributed across the globe and show a large diversity of ecological niches. Furthermore, taxonomic classification of Drosophila includes the rank radiation, which refers to closely related species groups. Nevertheless, it has never been tested if these taxonomic radiations correspond to evolutionary radiations. Here we present a study of the patterns of diversification of Drosophila to test for increased diversification rates in relation to the geographic and ecological diversification processes. For this, we have estimated and dated a phylogeny of 218 species belonging to the major species groups of the subgenus. The obtained phylogenies are largely consistent with previous studies and indicate that the major groups appeared during the Oligocene/Miocene transition or early Miocene, characterized by a trend of climate warming with brief periods of glaciation. Ancestral reconstruction of geographic ranges and ecological resource use suggest at least two dispersals to the Neotropics from the ancestral Asiatic tropical disribution, and several transitions to specialized ecological resource use (mycophagous and cactophilic). Colonisation of new geographic regions and/or of new ecological resources can result in rapid species diversification into the new ecological niches available. However, diversification analyses show no significant support for adaptive radiations as a result of geographic dispersal or ecological resource shift. Also, cactophily has not resulted in an increase in the diversification rate of the repleta and related groups. It is thus concluded that the taxonomic radiations do not correspond to adaptive radiations.
dc.relation.ispartofseries 7(11);;2012
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/1
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/2
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/3
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/4
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/5
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/6
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/7
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/8
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/9
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.v0t0d/10
dc.relation.isreferencedby doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0049552
dc.relation.isreferencedby PMID:23152919
dc.subject phylogenetics
dc.subject systematics
dc.subject diversification patterns
dc.subject ecology
dc.subject biogeography
dc.title Data from: Phylogenetic patterns of geographical and ecological diversification in the subgenus Drosophila
dc.type Article *
dwc.ScientificName Drosophila
dc.contributor.correspondingAuthor Morales-Hojas, Ramiro
prism.publicationName PLoS ONE

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Title Figure 1 xml file
Downloaded 74 times
Description xml file used in the BEAST analyses of Drosophila using 218 ingroup species and 9 calibration points.
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Title Figure 1 tree
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Description Figure 1. Summarized chronogram for the subgenus Drosophila obtained with BEAST using 218 species and 9 calibration points. It corresponds to the analysis run with the Figure 1 xml file.
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Title Figure 2 xml file
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Description xml file used to run the BEAST analysis of Figure 2, using 153 species for which there was sequence data for 2 or 3 genes and 9 calibration points.
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Title Figure 2 tree
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Description Summarized chronogram for the subgenus Drosophila obtained with BEAST using 153 species and 9 calibration points, corresponding to the Figure 2 xml file analysis.
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Title Figure 3 xml file
Downloaded 76 times
Description File used to run the BEAST analyses of the subgenus Drosophila obtained with BEAST using all 218 species and 5 calibration points. Corresponding to the Figure 3.
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Title Figure 3 tree
Downloaded 71 times
Description Figure 3. Summarized chronogram for the subgenus Drosophila obtained with BEAST using 218 species and 5 calibration points. It corresponds to the Figure 3 xml file.
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Title Fig4A
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Description Ancestral reconstruction of geographic distribution. Tree showing the main dispersal events inferred to have occurred during the evolution of the Drosophila subgenus.
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Title Fig4B
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Description Ancestral reconstruction of ecological niche. Trees showing the main ecological shifts inferred to have occurred during the evolution of the Drosophila subgenus.
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Title Fig5A
Downloaded 68 times
Description Figure 5. Backbone topology used in the MEDUSA analyses. A) phylogeny backbone from analysis with 218 species and 9 calibration points. Tip names refer to the species groups (those polyphyletic were clustered into a single clade) and numbers in brackets refer to the species richness of the tip. Numbers on nodes indicate divergence times.
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Title Fig5B
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Description Figure 5. Backbone topology used in the MEDUSA analyses. Phylogeny backbone from analysis with 218 species and 5 calibration points. Tip names refer to the species groups (those polyphyletic were clustered into a single clade) and numbers in brackets refer to the species richness of the tip. Numbers on nodes indicate divergence times.
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