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dc.contributor.author Brassey, Charlotte A.
dc.contributor.author Margetts, Lee
dc.contributor.author Kitchener, Andrew C.
dc.contributor.author Withers, Philip J.
dc.contributor.author Manning, Phillip L.
dc.contributor.author Sellers, William I.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-12-11T18:37:24Z
dc.date.available 2012-12-11T18:37:24Z
dc.date.issued 2012-11-21
dc.identifier doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f
dc.identifier.citation Brassey CA, Margetts L, Kitchener AC, Withers PJ, Manning PL, Sellers WI (2012) Finite element modelling vs. classic beam theory: comparing methods for stress estimation in a morphologically diverse sample of vertebrate long bones. Journal of the Royal Society Interface 10(79): 20120823.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10255/dryad.43771
dc.description Classic beam theory is frequently employed in biomechanics to model the stress behaviour of vertebrate long bones, particularly when creating intraspecific scaling models. Although methodologically straightforward, classic beam theory requires complex irregular bones to be approximated as slender beams, and the errors associated with simplifying complex organic structures to such an extent are unknown. Alternative approaches, such as Finite Element Analysis (FEA), whilst much more time-consuming to perform, require no such assumptions. This paper compares the results obtained using classic beam theory with those from FEA to quantify the beam theory errors and to provide recommendations about when a full FEA analysis is essential for reasonable biomechanical predictions. High-resolution computed tomographic (CT) scans of eight vertebrate long bones were used to calculate diaphyseal stress due to various loading regimes. Under compression, FEA values of minimum principal stress (σ_min) were on average 142%(±28% SE) larger than those predicted by beam theory, with deviation between the two models correlated to shaft curvature (2-tailed p=0.03, r^2=0.56). Under bending, FEA values of maximum principal stress (σ_max) and beam theory values differed on average by 12% (±4% SE), with deviation between the models significantly correlated to cross-sectional asymmetry at midshaft (2-tailed p=0.02, r^2=0.62). In torsion, assuming maximum stress values occurred at the location of minimum cortical thickness brought beam theory and FEA values closest in line, and in this case FEA values of τ_torsion were on average 14% (±5% SE) higher than beam theory. Therefore, FEA is the preferred modelling solution when estimates of absolute diaphyseal stress are required, although values calculated by beam theory for bending may be acceptable in some situations.
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f/1
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f/2
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f/3
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f/4
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f/5
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f/6
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f/7
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.9ct2f/8
dc.relation.isreferencedby doi:10.1098/rsif.2012.0823
dc.relation.isreferencedby PMID:23173199
dc.subject Finite element analysis
dc.subject Beam theory
dc.subject Biomechanics
dc.subject Curvature
dc.subject Cross-sectional asymmetry
dc.title Data from: Finite element modelling vs. classic beam theory: comparing methods for stress estimation in a morphologically diverse sample of vertebrate long bones
dc.type Article *
dc.contributor.correspondingAuthor Sellers, William I.
prism.publicationName Journal of the Royal Society Interface

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